How to Run VBScript, 3 Ways to Run a VBScript?

I’ve been using VBScript for many years. Below, I share the 3 different ways you can run VBScript on a Windows PC including running VBSCript as an Administrator.

3 Methods of Running VBScripts

  1. Run VBSCript in Windows Explorer
  2. Run VBScript from Windows Command Line
  3. Run VBScript as a Windows Administrator

For more VBScript info, try these excellent VBScript resources:

1. Run VBScript in Windows Explorer

  • Locate the VBScript file using Windows Explorer or place a copy on your Desktop
  • Identify VBScript files by the .vbs file extension
VBScript files in Windows Explorer
  • Double click the VBScript file.
  • You may or may not see anything depending on the program design.
  • To check to see if VBScript is running.
  • Run Windows task Keys Ctrl+Shift+Esc then sort by Image Name. Look for “wscript.exe”.
  • To kill a VBScript process, right click over “wscript.exe” and select “end process”.
  • You may see more than one “wscript.exe” on the task manager list as it can be run multiple times and new instances will execute.

2. Run VBScript from Windows Command Line

  • Click Windows Start
  • Open Command Window by Typing “CMD” and hit Enter
CMD exe from Windows Start Menu
  • Enter the full file path at the Command Line and hit Enter

3. Run a VBScript as a Windows Administrator

To run a VBScript as a Windows Admin:

  • Create a Windows Batch File that uses WScript.exe to open the .vbs file (See example below)
  • Run Windows Batch file as Admin and Admin Rights pass thru to the VBScript

Example Windows Batch File

Save the file below with a .cmd file extension. Then right click on it and select “Run as Admin”. Admin rights will be passed on to the VBScript

@echo off
pushd %~dp0
C:\Windows\System32\WScript.exe "My_VBScript.vbs"

How to Transfer Files from Windows PC to Linux Server Using Putty’s PSCP Command

Many blogs and web applications are being hosted on cloud based web servers. Of those web servers, many are running some flavor of the Linux operating system (OS).

If you’re a Windows PC user who is using a Linux web server for your online project then you have unique challenge that comes with being a dual OS user.

How will we transfer our files from our Windows development PC to our Linux cloud hosted blog or web app? Enter Putty and the PSCP command line tool!

What is Putty?

Putty is a Client application that handles connections to remote computers via the Telnet, SFTP and SSH protocols.

Putty Screenshot

What is PSCP?

PSCP is a command line application that is typically included in the Putty installation. PSCP transfers files between two computers from the Windows command line as long as firewalls allow the traffic on the designated ports for each type of traffic.

Transferring Files with PSCP from the Command Line

If you’ve installed Putty in the default directory, it will be here.

C:\Program Files\PuTTY

Open a Windows command line by clicking on the Windows start menu icon then entering “cmd” in the search field then find and click on the cmd icon.

Navigate to the Putty Directory by entering the command below.

C:\>CD c:\Program Files\Putty

Let’s look at an example PSCP command to transfer a file from a Windows PC to a Linux cloud web server with a fake user named root, IP of 45.99.99.99 and a target folder of /var/www/html

PSCP Command Example

c:\>C:\Program Files\Putty\pscp c:\temp\sample.txt root@45.99.99.99:/var/www./html

Screenshot

That’s all you should need to know about connecting to a Linux cloud based web server from a Windows PC using the Putty SSH client.

Hope this helps you on your Cyber journey!

~Cyber Abyss

VBScript WMI: How to Get Computer Serial Number from Local or Remote Windows PC

This Windows WMI script using VBScript, retrieves the serial number of the local or networked computer.

To use this code, copy it in to a text file and save it with a .vbs file extension for VBScript. Once you have the .vbs file, double click on it and you should get a message box with the names of the logged in user on the specified Windows PC on your network.

Windows WMI VBScript

Function GetComputerSerialNumber(strComputer)
	Set objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:" _
		& "{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" & strComputer & "\root\cimv2") 

	Set colComputer = objWMIService.ExecQuery _
		("SELECT * FROM Win32_ComputerSystemProduct",,48)
	 
	For Each objComputer in colComputer
		GetComputerSerialNumber = objComputer.IdentifyingNumber
	Next	
	
End Function

'strComputer = "XPS1234"
strComputer = "."

' Pass a . to run this on your own PC or add a string value for another on your network
call msgbox(GetComputerSerialNumber(strComputer))

How to Retrieve Logged in User from a Windows PC using VBScript WMI

If your in need of finding out who is logged on to a specific Windows PC on your network, run the VBScript below.

When executed, you’ll see a message box with the name of the account currently logged in the computer specified.

The VBScript Code

To use this code, copy it in to a text file and save it with a .vbs file extension for VBScript. Once you have the .vbs file, double click on it and you should get a message box with the names of the logged in user on the specified Windows PC on your network.

Function GetLoggedinUser(strComputer)
	Set objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:" _
		& "{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" & strComputer & "\root\cimv2") 

	Set colComputer = objWMIService.ExecQuery _
		("Select * from Win32_ComputerSystem")
	 
	For Each objComputer in colComputer
		Wscript.Echo "Logged-on user: " & objComputer.UserName
	Next	
	
End Function

' Pass a . to run this on your own PC or add a string value name for PC on your network
'strComputer = "XPS1234"
strComputer = "."

call msgbox(GetLoggedinUser(strComputer))

Stay tuned for more scripts in upcoming blog posts!

Hope this helps somebody!
~Cyber Abyss

VBScript WMI: Get List of Administrators from Windows PC

I’m breaking down a large VBScript I wrote as part of a larger computer inventory system prototype I built for what later became a much larger company.

This project was a big time investment for me that provided a lot of value to the company until they went out and purchased a commercial product and even then, the commercial product had things it did not do as well as my prototype.

The scanning volume eventually got so big that I had to run copies of the script on different parts of Active Directory at the same time to try and scale the scanning of computers on the network with all the data being stored in a SQL database backend.

This script and others I’ll be sharing in this series were contained within a loop of Active Directory computer records for a good size enterprise with about 10,000 desktops and laptops for some Active Directory OUs.

This script leverages Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) to query what’s going on with this Windows network PC.

The first piece of code I’m sharing is for querying the Windows WMI to get a list of Administrators from a Windows PC. This code was used as part of a project to determine if any computers had unauthorized admin accounts we didn’t know about.

GetAdminstrators Function

To use this code, copy it in to a text file and save it with a .vbs file extension for VBScript. Once you have the .vbs file, double click on it and you should get a message box with the names of the admin accounts from the target device.

Function GetAdministrators(strComputerName)
On Error Resume Next

    Dim objWMIService, strQuery, colItems, Path, strMembers, strAdminList, iCounter
	iCounter = 0
    Set objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" & strComputerName & "\root\cimv2")
    strQuery = "select * from Win32_GroupUser where GroupComponent = " & chr(34) & "Win32_Group.Domain='" & strComputerName & "',Name='Administrators'" & Chr(34)
    Set ColItems = objWMIService.ExecQuery(strQuery,,48)
    strMembers = ""
    For Each Path In ColItems
		Dim strMemberName, NamesArray, strDomainName, DomainNameArray
        NamesArray = Split(Path.PartComponent,",")
		strMemberName = Replace(Replace(NamesArray(1),Chr(34),""),"Name=","")
		DomainNameArray = Split(NamesArray(0),"=")
        strDomainName = Replace(DomainNameArray(1),Chr(34),"")
        If strDomainName <> strComputerName Then
            strMemberName = strDomainName & "\" & strMemberName
			if iCounter = 0 then
				strAdminList =  strMemberName
			else
				strAdminList = strAdminList & " > " & strMemberName 
			end if
			iCounter = iCounter + 1
			
        End If
	Next
	
	GetAdministrators = strAdminList
End Function
' Pass a . to run this on your own PC or add a string value for another on your network
call msgbox(GetAdministrators("."))
call msgbox(GetAdministrators("NetworkComputer1"))

Stay tuned for more scripts in upcoming blog posts!

Hope this helps somebody!
~Cyber Abyss

How to Join MP4 Files Together Using the Windows Command Line

I have two MP4 files that I need to merge together into one single file.

You might think that you would need a special piece of software to combine two MP4 video files but all it takes is a single command from the Windows command line to do the job.

copy /b "C:\File1.mp4" + "C:\File2.mp4" NewCombinedMoveFile.mp4
 

That’s all it takes to combine two MP4 movies files in to one since file.

Hope this helps sombody!

~ CyberAbyss